Journal Abstracts

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  • Abstract:

    This article explores the impact of infant death on cultural perceptions of infancy. It employs a case study of the Cree-Ojibwa community of Fisher River, Manitoba in the early twentieth century to illustrate how a high risk of infant death can delay the point at which personhood is conferred on an infant. Further to this, the concept of infancy among the Aboriginal community is contrasted with wider Euro-Canadian values concerning the infant mortality rate.

  • Abstract:

    Decades of research on child development has confirmed that infants use specific behavioral signals to elicit maternal responses. This research has also demonstrated the importance of a fit between maternal and infant behavior for optimal psychological and cognitive development of the infant. There is now evidence from animal behavioral studies that neuroendocrine and hormonal mechanisms mediate this link between infant signaling and maternal responsiveness.

  • Abstract:

    An evolutionary perspective on human infancy suggests that the active infant, skilled at information-gathering and -prompting from adults, and at coordinating its behavior with that of adults, has been shaped by millions of years of natural selection. Infant monkeys and apes are skilled in these ways because they have to be; adults rarely donate information to them, although the contexts in which they do are likely to have evolutionary significance.

  • Abstract:

    The proliferation of third party conceptions has answered the prayers of some infertile couples for a child. At the same time it has created a variety of profound biological, ethical, legal, social and psychological problems. In this paper an attempt is made to explore specifically the psychological issues consequent to the use of AI, IVF and surrogate motherhood.

  • Abstract:

    Historically, most studies on prenatal learning have centered upon contingency reinforcements, habituation responses, and developmental outcomes. Very little research has actually examined the learning process during the prenatal period. This case study examines the behavioral responses of one prenate to an experimental curriculum. Significant responses are noted in regards to movement. The responses appear as an organized pattern which would imply that the prenate is capable of progressing from generality and abstraction to specificity and discernment in the learning process.

  • Abstract:

    Although most societies highly value and nurture children, children in many societies may nonetheless be unwanted under certain conditions. Thus, decisions about parental investment, and social control of reproduction and pre- and perinatal survival are not solely a modern phenomenon. Many societies act to limit the incidence of pregnancy, birth and infant survival, and have done so for centuries. These societies have traditional means for controlling birth and for aborting unwanted pregnancies.

  • Abstract:

    In the 1980's parents were first introduced in large numbers to the sensitive, perceptive, conscious, and perhaps even cognitive prenate. This paper summarizes the major evidence, including recent research findings, demonstrating that prenates are 1) sensitive and aware, 2) learn and dream, and 3) are social and communicative. Well-designed research programs in prenatal enrichment confirm the intelligence and receptivity of these babies. A closing section describes the special resources now available to parents to enhance prenatal bonding and communication.

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  • Abstract:

    It takes much neglect, rejection, humiliation, physical maltreatment and sexual abuse to transform a tiny, trusting, innocent human being into a callous, cruel and vicious person. This paper examines some of the factors that lead to the development of the violent personality from conception on. It is suggested that the answer to violence is not state violence. The answer is conscious pre and postnatal parenting supported by social institutions, laws and practices which attend to the needs of pregnant parents, particularly, the disadvantaged. Our motto should be: BUILD BABIES NOT JAILS.

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