Journal Abstracts

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  • Abstract:

    KEY WORDS: Doula, postpartum care, breastfeeding, parenting.

  • Abstract:

    A holonomic holographic integrated model of early development is introduced reflecting clinical findings from prenatal and perinatal psychology as well as current western early development thought.

  • Abstract:

    This phenomenological study aims to portray the nature of the shared experiences of Israeli women who became pregnant and gave birth after surviving the trauma of terrorism in order to learn how maternity experiences can either augment the process of posttraumatic healing or exacerbate the wound inflicted by the trauma. Data was collected via open-ended interviews with eight women who shared the stories of their experiences. Data analysis revealed findings in four categories: losses, maternity through the prism of otherness, maternity as empowerment and transformational processes.

  • Abstract:

    The purpose of this longitudinal observational survey was to compare a questionnaire on fetal auditive exposure, administered to 58 pregnant women, to the Mac Arthur questionnaire recording the communicative and linguistic development of their children when ten- and eighteen-months-old. By 'fetal auditive exposure' we mean the natural exposure to the acoustic stimuli that the fetuses experience through their mother's living environment.

  • Abstract:

    On a theoretical level, this article aims to categorize the increasingly large body of work that exists on fatherhood in order to gain a better understanding of the psychic aspects involved in this stage of development. In a second time, the authors expose two case studies of a clinical research on the transition processes among first-time fathers. The subjects were 25 Greek men of an average age of 30, who were to become father and who participated to a semi-directive interview before and after the birth of their first child.

  • Abstract:

    This article continues the dialogue on the origins of heath as beginning in the womb. It points to the positive effects and changes that can occur when re-evaluating the importance of the pregnancy period for matters of public health. A brief review of the literature on dietary habits preconception/prenatally, and the intrauterine pollution of fat-soluble synthetic chemicals were offered. Followed by the description of a pilot study for the purpose of initiating a new generation of research.

  • Abstract:

    This article presents a method that has been developed in Germany, during practical work in an office for gynecology, obstetrics, and psychotherapy, which has resulted in an astoundingly low rate of premature births among the pregnant women cared for. The actual rate of premature births in the last 15 years stands at something over 1 per cent instead of about 7 per cent usual in Germany. It has been found that a threatened premature birth should be regarded within the entirety of physical and emotional processes.

  • Abstract:

    Based the principles presented in the book she co-authored with Judith Acosta, LCSW, The worst is over: What to say when every moment counts, Dr. Prager focuses in this article on the application of these techniques for expectant parents. This is accomplished with reference to a wide variety of background concepts, including Native American and other traditional cultures, as well as Chaos Theory. Dr.

  • Abstract:

    The association of preeclampsia with both high and low birth weight challenges the current belief that reduced uteroplacental perfusion is the unique pathophysiologic process in preeclampsia. Preeclampsia is thus presented from a new perspective, in the framework of maternal/fetal conflict. Interspecies comparisons encourage us to raise new questions concerning the potential for conflict among humans. The spectacular brain growth spurt during the second half of fetal life is a specifically human trait.

  • Abstract:

    This study aims at exploring the psychological impact of emotional support during childbirth and thus to discuss it in the light of humanized principles of assistance. Methods: clinical study carried through intermittent observation of the labor and birth, when the emotional stages of the parturient and emotional support she received from the midwife were observed. Interviews about the women's experience of labor were performed before hospital discharge.

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