Journal Abstracts

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  • Abstract:

    Abstract: In the 1980’s parents in large numbers were first introduced to the sensitive, perceptive, conscious, and cognitive prenate. This paper summarizes the evidence from major research findings, demonstrating that prenates are 1) sensitive and aware, 2) learn and dream, and 3) are social and communicative. Well-designed experimental programs in prenatal enrichment confirm the intelligence and receptivity of womb babies. A closing section describes the special resources now available to parents who want to deliberately enhance prenatal bonding and communication.

  • Abstract:

    Disruptions in maternal-infant bonding are shown to be the mediating variable between maternal distress and the subsequent expression of childhood asthma. When bonding is repaired, it seems that children’s asthmatic symptoms diminish or remit. This study evaluated 16 asthmatic children before and after their mothers were treated with bonding therapy. Fourteen improved on 11 measures, including reduction in STEP classification system and medication use. Thirteen children were able to stop all medications. The links between bonding disruptions,

  • Abstract:

    There have been many recent studies set up to examine the characteristics of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and Sleeping Disorders (SDO), some separately and others to determine whether or not there is a link between them. To control behavior, medication is the most frequent method of treatment for ADHD, even though there is not yet an understanding of long-term effects of chemical intervention.

  • Abstract:

    Four essays of unique importance in the field of prenatal and perinatal psychology and health are reprinted here with the permission of Michel Odent, Director of the Primal Health Research Center in London and editor of the newsletter Primal Health Research. Essay No. 1 focuses on the use of sytnthetic oxytocin, called

  • Abstract:

    Shame is a powerful emotion born of implicit mind and with lasting implications. This brief essay explores the source of this experience, including its possible role as an instrument of survival, its relationship to the processes of bonding and attachment, and its developmental aspects.
    Key Words: Shame, Attachment, Dysregulation, Mother

  • Abstract:

    This paper will explore the effects on the unborn and newborn child of psychological stress, depression, and other relevant maternal factors in the pre and perinatal period. Particular attention will be paid to the effects of stress on the organization and function of the fetal brain, on neurohormones, the immune system, personality evolution, as well as on the development of many childhood and adult diseases.

  • Abstract:

    Repairing the broken bond between a mother and her child is relatively easy when one knows how to do it. The four-stage protocol presented here involves (I) suspecting that there is a bonding problem, (II) searching for the cause, (III) metabolizing the painful feelings, and (IV) creating an alternative birth. The therapy is short, quick, and effective. Eight cases are presented as examples.

  • Abstract:
    This article addresses the question, “What are the waterside hypotheses of human evolution”? The environments our Homo Sapiens ancestors adapted to through the evolutionary process remain to a certain extent unknown and open to theoretical investigation. When we do such investigation, it is revealed that there are obstetrical implications of the waterside hypotheses that also bear investigation. This article begins to make the important connections.
  • Abstract:
    Pregnancy as a feminine initiation becomes conscious to a woman when she engages with her pregnant imagination through dreams, art, emotions, and somatic changes. If the woman acknowledges her emotional and psychological reactions arising from core archetypal patterns, a “conscious pregnancy” occurs. Three stages of the initiation are outlined: Gateway, Attending, and Passage. Focusing on the Attending stage, three key psychological components are explored: shadow, syzygy, and simultaneity. Viewing the prenatal psyche through C.G.
  • Abstract:

    In order to validate external perceptions there are clear criteria in the natural sciences as to what is known and what is not known. In psychology we are dealing with internal perceptions, where the boundary between knowledge and non-knowledge cannot be so clearly defined due to the subjectivity of the observer. However, during the past hundred years, a culture of validation of internal perceptions has been developed in psychoanalysis and other psychotherapies by means of controlled self experience and supervision.

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