Journal Abstracts

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  • Abstract:
  • Abstract:

    As the medical myths used to justify the practice of neonatal circumcision have each been disproven, the latest "myth" used by circumcisers to perpetuate the surgery is that the use of topical and local anesthetics "eliminates" the pain of neonatal circumcision. While some interventions have reduced the amount of crying during the surgery, it is not clear whether topical or local anesthetics reduce pain substantially. Their impact on the stress of the surgery appears to be minimal.

  • Abstract:

    The author uses his experience as an anesthesiologist involved in music medicine to discuss the psychophysiology of perinatal stress. The use of music as an adjunct to medical care for mother and child in the prenatal and postnatal period, as well as the implications for improved outcome and medical cost savings are addressed. The importance of the fetal auditory environment as a conduit for communication and learning is also examined.

  • Abstract:

    This article brings together the ancient practice of yoga, specifically the postures (asanas) and other therapeutic techniques in a holistic approach to therapy that includes understanding of birth and prenatal experiences as basic. With a focus on the potential for using yoga postures in psychotherapy, research was completed involving 22 children, ages four years and eight months through nine years and eleven months. These children were video-taped while performing a series of five, especially selected, yoga postures.

  • Abstract:

    This article sets the beginnings of research in prenatal stimulation in historical context with the larger movement of infant research surrounding it. Of particular interest is the evidence for prenatal intelligence, which is here organized around new definitions provided by Richard Sternberg and Howard Gardner. This evidence provides parents with additional reasons to begin communication with prenates as soon as possible and provides psychologists with additional reasons to formulate a larger paradigm to describe the true nature of prenates.

  • Abstract:

    This paper reviews The Prenatal University stimulation program, which is designed: 1) to create an interactive relationship between parents-to-be and the developing fetus, and 2) to reinforce a "preconscious awareness of the environment" by the developing fetus. The prenatal stimulation program is designed with working parents in mind. Only two five-minute sessions are required per day for effective implementation. Both mother and father are involved; siblings and other relatives are also encouraged to join in the game-like sessions.

  • Abstract:

    In a study designed to create an enriched environment for prenates by minimizing environmental stressors and substituting a positive, stimulating milieu, we designed a program that would reduce maternal stress with visualization and relaxation exercises, encourage mother-child bonding through prenatal communication and interaction exercises, and pleasantly stimulate prenatal auditory, tactile, visual and vestibular processes.

  • Abstract:

    Historically, most studies of prenatal learning have centered upon contingency reinforcements, habituation responses, and developmental outcomes. Very little research has examined the learning process during the prenatal period. This case study examines the behavioral responses of one prenate to an experimental curriculum. Significant movement responses are noted. The responses appear as an organized pattern which would imply that the prenate is capable of progressing from generality and abstraction, to specificity and discernment in the learning process.

  • Abstract:

    This paper explores the effectiveness of the Firstart prenatal stimulation method applied to a sample of maternity patients at University Hospital "La Fe" in Valencia, with 71 women in the control group and 101 in the experimental group. Both groups were enrolled in the birth preparation course offered at the hospital. In addition, future mothers in the experimental group wore a waistband equipped with small speakers connected to a tape recorder which played a series of eight tapes of violin sounds.

  • Abstract:

    Based on systematic measurement of experimental and control group participants from birth to age six, the authors conclude that a program of prenatal intervention beginning in the fifth prenatal month produces significant improvement in newborns, their mothers, and in family solidarity. All the parents in this study lived in poor ghettos of Caracas. Annual measurements reveal that the infants receiving the extra care and attention maintained a consistent lead in development throughout the six-year testing period.

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