Journal Abstracts

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    One in seven women in the United States experience postpartum depression (PPD). However, despite general awareness of this condition many cases are not identified or treated. Left untreated, postpartum depression may become severe, affecting not only the mother, but also her family—most notably her child’s development and health. A major question is who will screen women for PPD? Medical professionals may or may not ask a new mother about depressive symptoms (either formally via questionnaire or informally in conversation), and mothers may or may not answer these questions truthfully.

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    Suzanne Arms is an author, teacher, photojournalist, practical visionary and activist. She is a mother and grandmother, and strong and vocal supporter of APPPAH, a champion of midwifery and empowered women and a passionate and compassionate speaker. The second of her seven books, Immaculate Deception: A New Look at Childbirth, was named a best Book of the Year by the New York Times in 1975 and sold over 250,000 copies. Arms received a Lamaze Lifetime Achievement Award and was named A Living Treasure by Mothering Magazine for her work as an agent of change.

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    Abstract: A newborn separated from his mother at birth and relinquished for adoption is susceptible to a primal wounding. This construct describes the deep psychic scarring and lasting emotional impact of adoption caused by the sudden severing of the in utero bond with the biological mother. The results of the trauma are believed to be substantial and to carry major long-term developmental effects, and yet the nature of those implications remains poorly understood.

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    Abstract: Birth is life-altering event. Under the best circumstances, it is a happy one. Labor and delivery can be empowering, with mothers feeling that they have accomplished something great. Unfortunately, birth can also be difficult, overwhelming, and for some, traumatic. Without intervention, childbirth-related trauma and PTSD can last for years, coloring how women feel about themselves as mothers, and potentially marring their relationships with partners and babies. Birth trauma and breastfeeding intersect in some key ways. Birth trauma can negatively impact breastfeeding.

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    William Emerson, PhD, is a renowned and early pioneer in the field of pre- and perinatal psychology. He practiced pre- and perinatal psychotherapy for more than 40 years, specializing in regression therapy and developing and implementing methods for treating pre- and perinatal trauma in infants, children and adults. He was the first in the world to develop treatment techniques for infants, including psychotherapeutic interventions. He is a renowned workshop leader, writer, and international lecturer and has been active in promoting research and practice in pre- and peri-natal psychology.

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    The aim of this article is to report the results of an Internet-based survey conducted in Japan concerning the four types of children’s memories: (i) birth memories; (ii) womb memories; (iii) life-between-life or prelife memories (memories before conception); and (iv) past-life memories. A child having one type of these memories often possesses other types (Ohkado & Ikegawa, 2014). It is expected that analyzing these four types of memories simultaneously will shed new light on children’s psychology.

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    A growing body of research indicates that high levels of prenatal maternal stress (PNMS) can have lasting negative impacts on offspring. This review examines current literature about the structural and physiological effects of gestational stress on the brain of the fetus.

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