Journal Abstracts

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  • Abstract:

    The significance of parent-infant holding for infant development is emphasized from a psychobiological point of view as an essential ingredient of bonding. The theoretical perspective of direct perception in a perceiver-environment ecosystem (Gibson) is discussed together with current findings in infant research, as they may apply to explain how differential parent-infant holding patterns influence the infant's perception of his environment. Impacts of holding patterns on parent-infant-interaction are also mentioned. General qualities of facilitating holding patterns are elaborated.

  • Abstract:

    The development of narcissism and masochism is examined by utilizing new data from movement observation, in general, and from observations and notation of fetal movement, in particular. This has led to the recognition that fetal movements are motor precursors of psychic functioning. The suggestion is made that both narcissism and masochism have their Anlage in utero. Because the fetus primarily grows and achieves progressive integration, the ratio between his integration and self-destruction favors the former.

  • Abstract:

    The authors examine psychosocial factors involved in producing pregnancy complications. An initial descriptive study of the development of psychosocial profiles of three groups of pregnant women (high and low risk for preterm birth and with diabetes mellitus) using seven instruments is presented. The study suggests that economic status may be as important as medical risk as a source of distress among pregnant women.

  • Abstract:

    Scores on six psychosocial questionnaires were compared to the risk of delivering an IUGR infant. In the second trimester, scales for stress, anxiety, social support, mastery, self esteem, and depression were prospectively administered to 1500 indigent women. In univariate analyses, significant relationships were found between IUGR and a poor score for mastery, stress, anxiety and self-esteem. The results were additive in that the more poor the scores, the higher the rate of IUGR.

  • Abstract:

    Stressful experiences recalled by 270 mothers beginning a year prior to pregnancy through to the end of pregnancy were compared for right, left, and mixed handed offspring of both sexes. For the male offspring, mothers of left handers recalled significantly more severe stress throughout pregnancy than mothers of either right or mixed handers. For the female offspring, no significant differences were found.

  • Abstract:

    The relationship between birth trauma and suicide is discussed. A critique of psychoanalytic theory is presented. A number of studies linking suicide to birth trauma are surveyed. A synthetic theory of this relationship is described and the positive role of therapy in resolving birth trauma-related conflict is explored.

  • Abstract:

    Data were obtained as part of a larger experimental study of 48 genetic amniocentesis patients, ages 21 to 40. Information about genetic counseling was obtained through the demographic data questionnaire. State anxiety was measured before the procedure. Pre-event anxiety scores of women who had received genetic counseling before the day of the procedure were compared with those who had not received counseling before their appointment day.

  • Abstract:

    This paper refers to the role of proto-rhythms in future musical acquisition as basis for the birth of musical intelligence and language expression. It also analyzes the role of rhythm in the very early vocal expressions of newborn babies and of the relation with expressions uttered between their 22nd and 24th months of age. The work presents transcriptions in musical symbols from the 1st cry up to the expressions of the year of life. Proto-rhythms are described and analyzed as well as their importance in back-feeding them.

  • Abstract:

    The meaning and usefulness of the concept of cross-cultural childbirth is questioned in this paper. Intracultural variations within Southern African Black women's experiences of childbirth are utilized to explore the validity of the cross-cultural concept. The question of universality or diversity of birth experiences is discussed. Possible universal elements of birth are suggested while factors determining variations in these experiences are proposed.

  • Abstract:

    At birth mother and infant are in a common state of "kinesthesia." This constitutes a "kinesthetic bond." It results from the motion tracking between mother and child throughout the pregnancy. They feel each others' motion by means of touch through the uterine wall. If the sensory information they use to define their relationship is disrupted by physical separation after birth, before other sensory modes of relating are established, the relationship may suffer.

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