Journal Abstracts

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  • Abstract:

    The aim of this research is to investigate whether postpartum stress symptoms may persist through time and whether these symptoms may he connected to temperamental characteristics of the child. The underlying hypothesis is that child temperament may both affect stress symptom persistence and itself be a stress source for the mother.

  • Abstract:

    The purpose of the current study was to explore associations between maternal anxiety and infant temperament. Participants (n = 60 women) completed measures of state and trait anxiety during the third trimester of pregnancy and again three months postpartum, as well as an assessment of infant temperament. Maternal trait anxiety predicted infant distress to novelty and limitations, and difficulty soothing. Antenatal state anxiety predicted less infant positive affect and lower attention-span. Postnatal state anxiety was related to infant activity level and distress to limitations.

  • Abstract:

    Reports of 32 adopted children who sought breastfeeding from their mothers are presented. Children were 8 months to 12 years at placement and sought breastfeeding from the day of placement to several years after. Some children suckled only a few times whereas others breastfed frequently over a protracted period. Suckling was comforting to children and assisted some in expressing grief over birth mother loss. Mothers felt that breastfeeding assisted in attachment development.

  • Abstract:

    Infant feeding decisions and practices were examined in a preliminary cross-cultural sample of the U.S. and Colombia using the Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA) and the Transtheoretical Model (TM) (Humphreys, Thompson & Miner, 1998) as a theoretical framework. The sample consisted of 80 participants in the third trimester of pregnancy, 40 were recruited in the U.S. and 40 in Colombia. As hypothesized, breastfeeding rates were significantly higher in Colombia than in the U.S.

  • Abstract:

    This study examines relationships between perceptions of control, postpartum depression, and physiological symptoms in women who gave birth vaginally or by cesarean. Extrapolating from a cognitive framework, it was hypothesized that women who gave birth by cesarean would exhibit lower levels of perceived control and higher levels of depression and physiological symptoms as compared with women who gave birth vaginally. Results were supportive of the hypotheses, suggesting that it may be helpful to explore ways of assisting women to experience greater control over their childbirth.

  • Abstract:

    This is the first known study of the psychosocial impact of terrorism among pregnant women. Ninety-nine women attending prenatal care in New York City were interviewed after September 11, 2001 and classified by drinking patterns. Current drinkers with a history of alcohol dependence perceived less social support following the disaster compared to other women. History of illegal drug use prior to maternal awareness of pregnancy was related to a weaker maternal-fetal bond. Greater exposure to trauma predicted stronger subjective effects and more depressive symptoms.

  • Abstract:

    Over the past 70 years former Soviet Union women have had relatively different reproductive lives and histories than their European counterparts. Since the break-up of the Soviet Union those countries that have European roots now have the possibility to transition toward a Western standard of living. Belarus is a country bordering Poland, and in three years time will likely be one of the countries just outside of the European Union borders.

  • Abstract:

    Franz Renggli, Ph.D. presents an in-depth discussion of his work as a psychoanalyst and body psychotherapist in Basel, Switzerland. This discussion is enhanced by the inclusion of several case studies.

    KEY WORDS: body psychotherapy, birth psychology.

  • Abstract:

    In this paper the author explores varying behaviors of fathers during the prenatal life of the unborn from a psychoanalytic and family system perspective, enriched by studies from the field of prenatal psychology. He suggests broadening the meaning of behavior to encompass communications that are not clearly visible, audible, or tangible, and emphasizes the importance of the communication of affect in assessing whether an expression of caring and love is genuine and sincere.

  • Abstract:

    Reflections of a practicing obstetrician on the question of hospital vs. home birth, specifically addressing the issue of increased interventions, in ways known to be traumatic to babies, that are typical of many hospital births. This increased intervention has created increasing dissatisfaction in mothers of the birth experience. The attempt is made to simplify the arguments that support home birth when compared to the hospital management of labor and birth.

    KEY WORDS: homebirth, hospital birth, midwife care.

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