Journal Abstracts

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  • Abstract:

    The birthing experience may be perceived as a traumatic in women who present with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Yet a woman's view can change if she gains knowledge about the birth experience. Narrative debriefing, for example, is a source of validation, through the telling and listening of birth narratives. Further, by reading books and articles, taking mental notes, and comparing outcomes women can reevaluate their own experiences and their perceptions change as a result. Women may require repetitive debriefing to facilitate healing from birth-related trauma.

  • Abstract:

    Early childhood literature suggests children born after the loss of an infant sibling are at risk for attachment disorders, yet there continues to be a lack of intervention available to support the parents of these children during their pregnancies. The stories of these adult subsequent children give meaning to why attachment disorders can result and provide a strong case for intervention around infant loss and the subsequent pregnancy. Contrary to other studies on this topic, these participants summarize healing and hope.

  • Abstract:

    This article explores the use of visual language as a means of examining and communicating the subjective experience of pregnancy. The participants, eleven women in their final trimester of pregnancy, were asked to complete five abstract drawings accompanied by verbal descriptions of their own perceptions and feelings. Using specialized concept cards developed by Rhyne (1979), participants were invited to consider four distinctive "mind states" or feeling states - sadness, anger, fear and joy.

  • Abstract:

    Searching for the possible roots of anger, the author, from extensive experiential, clinical work with clients looks at the pre-conception imprinting that colours not only the birth, but also the life scripts and personality of humans, in order to find healing from violent, angry, raging negative imprinting.

  • Abstract:

    This article, after introducing the sandplay© method developed by Dora Kalff, explores the images seen in the work of sandplay© clients that may depict birth and/or prenatal experiences. In contrast to other modalities that employ sand trays, the Kalfian method relies on the power of the medium; sand, water, a collection of miniatures, and a tray of specific dimensions, to evoke a process within the client that is not dependent upon interpretation for healing. Case study examples are used to amplify some of the symbols that portray natalistic themes.

  • Abstract:

    This article reviews existing research on how a pregnant mother's mental health status, stress level, and temperament affect her unborn baby's sensory processing abilities. After a brief introduction to sensory integration and sensory processing, research on how scientists learn about the fetus' developing nervous system by observing his/her behavior is presented. Maternal temperament and increased stress during pregnancy often impact temperament and developmental delay.

  • Abstract:

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of “good, rational thoughts” (called “prayer”) on the fetus and the mother during the 3rd trimester of pregnancy. The good thoughts (prayer) are radiated, in the form of recording, from Swami Vijnananand, a person who was a selfless, benevolent, philosopher, thinker, who devoted his entire life for social good and totally isolated from the families undergoing the experiment. In all, 1850 cases were critically analyzed, in this study.

  • Abstract:

    Anxiety symptoms are common during pregnancy. However, predictors of prenatal anxiety have not been well researched. We tested a model of pregnancy anxiety conceptualized from a stress and coping framework in which pregnancy wantedness, maternal attachment style, and attachment history were expected to predict anxiety in late pregnancy. Controlling for parity and risk, maternal attachment history significantly predicted general anxiety symptoms. Current relationship and/or attachment difficulties predicted general anxiety and prenatal anxiety subdimensions.

  • Abstract:

    Compared with two surveys of usual care, these data provide strong support for the hypotheses that HypnoBirthing mothers have: fewer medical inductions (3.3%-21.1% difference); less IV fluids (37.9%-42.1% difference); less continuous fetal monitoring (42.4%-44.3% difference; less pitocin infusion (18%-19% difference); fewer artificial rupture of membranes (18.8%-18.9% difference); fewer IV/IM anesthesias (4.4%-5.7% difference); fewer episiotomies (13.3%-15.1% difference); fewer epidural anesthesias (44.6%-49.1% difference); fewer caesarian sections (14.4%-17% difference); less frequent use

  • Abstract:

    In the last two decades the classical post-Cartesian mind-body dualism (which by many scientist and philosophers is considered to be old-fashioned and overcome by modern monism of materialism) seems to be prevailed by a kind of body-brain dualism propagated by modern neurophysiology and neurophilosophy.

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