Blogs

FETAL SHORT TERM MEMORY

Memory probably begins during the prenatal period, but little is known about the exact timing or for how long memory lasts. Now in a new study from the Netherlands, scientists have found fetal short-term memory in fetuses at 30 weeks. GO TO NEWS WIRE

REDUCING VIOLENCE STARTS IN UTERO

Dr. Liu's study emphasizes the prenatal, perinatal, and postnatal periods, which are critical times for both a child's neuro-development and for environmental modifications. GO TO NEWS WIRE.. NOTE: Professor Jianghong Liu, PhD, RN, has additional articles published in our journal.

HOSPITAL BIRTH DEBATE

ScienceDaily (Sep. 19, 2012) — A new Cochrane Review concludes that all
countries should consider establishing proper home birth services. They should
also provide low-risk pregnant women with information enabling them to make an
informed choice. The review has been prepared by senior researcher, statistician
Ole Olsen, the Research Unit for General Practice, University of Copenhagen, and
midwifery lecturer PhD Jette Aaroe Clausen.

In many countries it is believed that the safest option for all women is to give

• DON't MISS FREEDOM FOR BIRTH DOCUMENTARY

New film titled FREEDOM FOR BIRTH is about how the obstetric system is violating women's rights to decide where and how they give birth.

This video features the criminalized Hungarian midwife Agnes Gereb plus many of the world's leading birth experts including Ina May Gaskin, Robbie Davis-Floyd, Professor Lesley Page, Professor Sally Tracy, Sarah Buckley and Anna Ternovsky, the woman who won a lawsuit to determine the circumstances of her birth at the European Court of Human Rights. Her case might just have changed the way the world thinks about birth.

• Yoga Reduces Depression ~ Boosts Bonding

Yoga Reduces Depression in Pregnant Women, Boosts Maternal Bonding

ScienceDaily (Aug. 8, 2012) — University of Michigan study the first to show
evidence that mindfulness yoga may offer effective treatment for depressed new
mothers to be. Prenatal yoga may help women cope with depression.

It's no secret that pregnancy hormones can dampen moods, but for some expectant
moms, it's much worse: 1 in 5 experience major depression.

Now, new research shows that an age-old recommended stress-buster may actually
work for this group of women: yoga.

• Human Twins at Birth Highlight Importance of Intrauterine Environment

ScienceDaily (July 15, 2012) — Your genes determine much about you, but
environment can have a strong influence on your genes even before birth, with
consequences that can last a lifetime. In a study published online in Genome
Research, researchers have for the first time shown that the environment
experienced in the womb defines the newborn epigenetic profile, the chemical
modifications to DNA we are born with, that could have implications for disease
risk later in life.

Epigenetic tagging of genes by a chemical modification called DNA methylation is

• Marijuana Use Prior to Pregnancy Doubles Risk of Premature Birth

ScienceDaily (July 17, 2012) — A large international study led by University of
Adelaide researchers has found that women who use marijuana can more than double
the risk of giving birth to a baby prematurely.

Preterm or premature birth -- at least three weeks before a baby's due date --
can result in serious and life-threatening health problems for the baby, and an
increased risk of health problems in later life, such as heart disease and diabetes.

A study of more than 3000 pregnant women in Adelaide, Australia and Auckland,

• Carrying trauma to the next generation

New evidence suggests that the trauma is not just psychological, but
biological and even heritable. By altering the chemical mechanisms regulating
gene expression, these modifications may become embedded in the male germ line,
and can be passed down to the victim's children.

The July 7 bombings and heritability: carrying trauma to the next generation
The offspring of male survivors of the July 7 bombings may inherit anxiety and
depression.
By Michael Stewart
The Telegraph

23 Nov 2010

• Policy Statement from American Academy of Pediatricians: Early experiences with significant stress are critical

Although not new to the APPPAH community, New York Times columnist, Nicolas Kristof, and The American Academy of Pediatricians (AAU) are talking about the effects of early toxic stress from conception onward.

New York Times column:
http://www.nytimes.com/2012/01/08/opinion/sunday/kristof-a-poverty-solut...

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