Letters to the Editor 10,4

Dear Dr. Carter,

Not often do I read an article in a professional journal of Pre- and Perinatal Psychology and Psychology in general that left me breathless with respect and wonderment. Dr. Moshe Amon's "Sharing Space: Two Views on the Dignity of Life" was a much needed gift or should be a gift to any rational human being of the late 20th century.

Though born and reared under the attempts to be/become a Roman catholic (I rejected its dogmas when I was eight years old), in our present culture, the millennia old Jewish wisdom about the dignity of man and life is like hearing a lone voice in the wilderness. For a minute I was even back in my college philosophy class where I heard Socrates say: "It is better to be wronged than to do wrong." In fact, as you probably well know, he died for his "way of life"/mind. And, while for the Jews "the whole truth can only be apprehended by mutual sharing of knowledge, i.e., through continuous dialogue among all Jews," I do see a connection with the Socratic method of dialectical inquiry-the never ending quest for self-knowledge and wisdom as the highest virtue. So not to be misunderstood, I have always maintained to the best of my abilities a separation between Plato's philosophy and Socrates'.

Anyway, I just wanted to thank you for the article.

Sincerely,

Paula M.S. Ingalls

Dear Ruth:

Here is a follow up paper to the one you accepted for this fall's issue of the Journal.

I think this complicated case would have been much easier to handle if the doctor could have stopped the useless treatments after her patient had demonstrated that she was not going to deliver a premature infant. I had to keep my mouth shut because "J" had a very good bonding with her woman gynecologist.

Again, I have included edited transcripts of the telephone communications to demonstrate mainly the importance of using positive semantics and the subtle difference between conscious and unconscious mental processes. The recording of two-way conversations on my telephone has been a blessing.

Thanks for being there and for being our Editor.

Sincerely,

David B. Cheek, M.D.