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Issue: 
Publication Date: 
September, 2020
Page Count: 
19
Starting Page: 
410
Brief Summary: 

This article aims to explore the process of the psychological birth of a mother by discussing: the shift in identity that takes place; why understanding the psychological experience of mothers matters; the various stages of transformation; the factors that influence the transformation; and the ways in which becoming a mother affects a woman’s identity, relationships, and career.

Abstract: 

There is no experience in a woman’s life that is more impactful, all-encompassing, and life-altering than becoming a mother. The transformation from woman to mother is a psychologically-profound experience that both overlaps and is separate from the physical experience of becoming a mother. This article aims to explore the process of the psychological birth of a mother by discussing: the shift in identity that takes place; why understanding the psychological experience of mothers matters; the various stages of transformation; the factors that influence the transformation; and the ways in which becoming a mother affects a woman’s identity, relationships, and career.

References: 

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