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Issue: 
Publication Date: 
June, 2018
Page Count: 
6
Starting Page: 
346
Brief Summary: 

This article provides background and examples for how using simple principles such as No Judgment, Firmness, and Gentleness, and No Hurry/No Pause in daily life offers a means for self-care in the midst of a hectic day. 

Abstract: 

The practice of Breema offers support for intentional parenting by providing practical tools for being present in everyday activities and interactions by unifying body, mind, and feelings. This article provides background and examples for how using simple principles such as No Judgment, Firmness, and Gentleness, and No Hurry/No Pause in daily life offers a means for self-care in the midst of a hectic day. This can provide an invaluable tool for modeling positive behaviors for children and offers the potential to be nourished, rather than drained, by the events of daily life.

References: 

Keng, S.L., Smoski, M.J., & Robins, C.J. (2011). Effects of mindfulness on psychological health: A review of empirical studies. Clinical Psychology Review, Aug,31(6), 1041-1056. doi: 10.1016/j.cpr.2011.04.006. Epub 2011 May 13.

McClafferty, H., Culbert, T., & Rosen, L. (2016). Mind-body therapies in children and youth. Pediatric Care Online. Retrieved from https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/presentation/7f5d/c6eae64fc3151eda81658e3c368fe22e0835.pdf

Schreiber, J. (2007). Breema and the nine principles of harmony. The Breema Center online. Retrieved from http://www.breema.com/index.php/ about_breema/principles

van der Kolk, B.A. (2015). The body keeps the score: Brain, mind and body in the healing of trauma. London: Penguin Books.