Warning message

This content is filtered. APPPAH membership is required for full access to journal articles.
-A +A
Issue: 
Publication Date: 
December, 2020
Page Count: 
14
Starting Page: 
507
Brief Summary: 

This article balances reflections on the author’s experience of earning a PhD in prenatal and perinatal psychology with information about current opportunities for others interested in pursuing such a degree. The article also explores why one might want to pursue such a degree and why it is important for our field to be represented by many individuals with advanced degrees in prenatal and perinatal psychology.

Abstract: 

This article balances reflections on the author’s experience of earning a PhD in prenatal and perinatal psychology with information about current opportunities for others interested in pursuing such a degree. The article also explores why one might want to pursue such a degree and why it is important for our field to be represented by many individuals with advanced degrees in prenatal and perinatal psychology.

References: 

Chamberlain, D. (1988). Babies remember birth. Jeremy P. Tarcher. Re-issued in 1998 as The mind of your newborn baby. North Atlantic Books.

Kendler, H.H. (1987). Historical foundations of modern psychology. Dorsey Press.

Rank, O. (1924/2010). The trauma of birth. Martino Fine Books.

Rhodes, J. (1997). Aware beginnings: Body language and birth memory through the lens of the ancient practice of yoga asana. Available in electronic form from the author.

Verny, T. & Kelly, J. (1981). The secret life of the unborn child. Dell Publishing.