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Issue: 
Publication Date: 
March, 2018
Page Count: 
9
Starting Page: 
271
Brief Summary: 

This paper focuses on the topic of childbirth, exploring the history of its marginalization within the humanities. This paper demonstrates that ignoring birth on an intellectual level contributes to diminishing the topic more broadly on the cultural level, and this has real-world implications for how our societies treat children, women, and families.

Abstract: 

This paper focuses on the topic of childbirth, exploring the history of its marginalization within the humanities. This history becomes particularly salient when we compare academic research on birth to that on death. This paper demonstrates that ignoring birth on an intellectual level contributes to diminishing the topic more broadly on the cultural level, and this has real-world implications for how our societies treat children, women, and families.

 

References: 

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