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Issue: 
Publication Date: 
December, 2016
Page Count: 
13
Starting Page: 
86
Brief Summary: 

This article undertakes the momentous task of addressing conflicted pregnancy which is one of the most difficult tasks for a prenatal psychologist. It delineates the history of the discussion regarding conflicted pregnancy in Europe, beginning in 2005 at an ISPPM congress, which resulted in the Charter of the Rights of the Child Before, During, and After Birth.

Abstract: 

This article undertakes the momentous task of addressing conflicted pregnancy which is one of the most difficult tasks for a prenatal psychologist. We know and feel the importance of earliest life in the womb. We know how trust is developed prenatally and becomes the foundation for future relationships and how basic imprints are developed that impact the individual’s future.

References: 

Buechler, J, (2008). Hypnotherapy for Avoiding and Coping of Pregnancy Conflict (Der Stellenwert der Hypnotherapie bei der Vermeidung und Bewältigung von Schwangerschaftskonflikten) in: Linder, R. (ed), Love, pregnancy, conflict and solution: Explorations of the psychodynamics of the pregnancy conflict (Liebe, Schwangerschaft, Konflikt und Lösung, Erkundungen zur Psychodynamik des Schwangerschaftskonflikts, Heidelberg: Mattes Verlag, 41–52.

Ehinger, C. & Renggli, F. (2008). The Prenatal Roots of Conflicts in Partnership (Die pränatale Wurzel von Konflikten in der Partnerschaft) in: Linder, R. (ed), Love, pregnancy, conflict and solution: Explorations of the psychodynamics of the pregnancy conflict (Liebe, schwangerschaft, konflikt und lösung: Erkundungen zur psychodynamik des schwangerschaftskonflikts), Heidelberg: Mattes Verlag, 153-174.

Hildebrandt, S., (2008). Ambivalence in Dealing with Contraception (Ambivalenz im Umgang mit Schwangerschaftsverhütung) in: Linder R (ed), Love, pregnancy, conflict and solution: Explorations of the psychodynamics of the pregnancy conflict (Liebe, schwangerschaft, konflikt und lösung: Erkundungen zur psychodynamik des schwangerschaftskonflikts), Heidelberg: Mattes Verlag, 29-40.

Kandel, E.R. (1989). Genes, nerve cells and the remembrance of things past. The Journal of Neuropsychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences 1(2), 103–125.

Linder, R., (2014). On the psychodynamics of preeclampsia and HELLP syndrome: Recent advances in treatment, Journal of Prenatal and Perinatal Psychology and Health, 29(2), 105-131.

Sonne, J.C. (1996). Interpreting the dread of being aborted in therapy, International Journal of Prenatal and Perinatal Psychology and Medicine,8(3), 317-339.

Sonne, J.C. (2002). On tyrants as abortion survivors, International Journal of Prenatal and Perinatal Psychology and Medicine, 14(3-4), 261-276.

Terry, K. & Team. (2009). Institute for Pre- and Perinatal Education. Umbilical Affect, Booklet http://www.ippe.info/publications/booklets.html.

 
Appendix One
 
Rights of the Child Before, During and After Birth
 
1.   Every child has the right to be respected as an independent person even before birth.
2.   Every child is entitled to a secure prenatal relationship and bonding.
3.   Every child has the right to respect for, and protection of, the continuity of its experiences during pregnancy and birth.
4.   Every child has the right to consideration being paid – right from the beginning – to the emotional and psychological impacts of any medical measures undertaken, and to responsibility being accepted for them.
5.   Every child has a right to assistance to ensure a loving, relationship-oriented welcome to the world that allows it to establish secure postnatal ties.
6.   Every child is entitled to nutrition of adequate quality before and after birth. If possible, every child should be breastfed.
7.   The rights of the child are associated with the right of future generations to be given the opportunity by society to develop their own potential as couples and as parents.
8.   This right to the development of parenting skills is associated with the right of the child to responsible, sensitive and relationship-oriented parents or guardians.
9.   In order to guarantee these rights, society's institutions have an obligation to support parents in performing their duties.
 
 
Clearly these rights are subject to the relative rights of others, particularly of the mother and family. Those with responsibility need to balance the relative rights with understanding of the issues involved, including those of the child.
 
This Charter is based on the Viennese Resolution of the International Society of Prenatal and Perinatal Psychology and Medicine (ISPPM), on the comments made by Gaby Stroecken and Rien Verdult on prenatal bonding and children's rights, on the resolution adopted by the International Congress on Embryology, Therapy and Society 2002 in Nijmegen (Netherlands) and on the Moscow Resolution of the Russian Society for Prenatal and Perinatal Psychology; these resolutions are available at www.isppm.de. The ISPPM website provides an extensive list of literature on the topic.

 

The Charter was adopted by the ISPPM's General Assembly on 3 June 2005 in Heidelberg.
Heidelberg, 3 June 2005