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Issue: 
Publication Date: 
September, 2019
Page Count: 
19
Starting Page: 
36
Brief Summary: 

This is a two-part article. Part One of this article describes four stages of cognition and their anthropological equivalents to better understand both the resistance to and the acceptance of pre- and perinatal psychology and other ways of thinking about birth. Part Two will appear in the Winter 2019 issue.

Abstract: 

To better understand both the resistance to and the acceptance of pre- and perinatal psychology and other ways of thinking about birth, Part One of this article describes four stages of cognition and their anthropological equivalents. I correlate Stage 1—closed, rigid thinking —with naïve realism (“our way is the only way”), fundamentalism (“our way is the only right way”), and fanaticism (“our way is so right that all others should be assimilated or eliminated”). Stage 2, ethnocentrism, insists “our way is best.” More open and fluid are Stage 3, cultural relativism, and Stage 4, global humanism.

References: 

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