Investigation by Questionnaire Regarding Fetal/Infant Memory in the Womb and/or at Birth

Issue: 
Publication Date: 
12/2005
Page Count: 
13
Starting Page: 
121
Price: $10.00
Abstract: 

The purpose of this study is to clarify the possession rate of fetal/infant memory in the womb and/or at birth and to validate its characteristic. A total of 1620 answered questionnaires of the 3601 distributed were returned, giving an overall recovery rate of 45.0%. The possession rates of womb and birth memory were 33.0% and 20.7%, respectively. Parents, too, responded with regard to their own memory from birth, and 1.1% appeared possessing such memory. The possession rate is relevant to the mother's feeling and speaking to the fetus during pregnancy, and irrelevant to the irregularity in delivery. Most memories were positive.

References: 

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Verny, T., with Weintraub, P. (2002). Pre-parenting nurturing your child from conception. New York: Simon & Schuster.

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Akira Ikegawa, Administrative Director of Ikegawa Clinic

Send correspondence to Akira Ikegawa, MD, PhD, Administrative Director of Ikegawa Clinic. Address: 2-5-13 Daidou Kanazawa-Ku Yokohama Japan 236-0035. Email: aikegawa@seaple.icc.ne.jp