Are Telepathy, Clairvoyance and "Hearing" Possible in Utero? Suggestive Evidence as Revealed During Hypnotic Age-Regression Studies of Prenatal Memory

Issue: 
Publication Date: 
01/1992
Page Count: 
13
Starting Page: 
125
Price: $10.00
Abstract: 

ABSTRACT: Evidence supplied through age-regression studies of adults based on a combination of ideomotor techniques and hypnosis suggests that telepathy, clairvoyance and some form of hearing are perceptions available to the human fetus from the emotional moment its mother knows she is pregnant onward. Fetal interpretation of maternal communications may be mistaken as rejection. Telepathic commands between mother and immature young probably have survival value for lower mammals. The mechanism for silent warning and absolute obedience needs completion before birth. Search methods and ways of reframing negative imprints are presented.

References: 

References

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David B. Cheek, M.D.

David B. Cheek, M.D. is now limiting his practice to the treatment of psychosomatic problems and teaching of hypnosis and ideomotor techniques in Santa Barbara, California. He is co-author with Leslie M. LeCron of "Clinical Hypnotherapy" and with Ernest Rossi of "Mind-Body Therapy." He is a Diplomate of the American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology, and a Fellow of the American College of Surgeons; the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists; and the American Society of Clinical Hypnosis, of which he is a past president. Address correspondence to the author at 1140 Bel Air Drive, Santa Barbara, CA 93105.