Womb

Investigation by Questionnaire Regarding Fetal/Infant Memory in the Womb and/or at Birth

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Publication Date: 
December 2005

The purpose of this study is to clarify the possession rate of fetal/infant memory in the womb and/or at birth and to validate its characteristic. A total of 1620 answered questionnaires of the 3601 distributed were returned, giving an overall recovery rate of 45.0%. The possession rates of womb and birth memory were 33.0% and 20.7%, respectively. Parents, too, responded with regard to their own memory from birth, and 1.1% appeared possessing such memory.

References: 

Chamberlain, D. (1988). Babies remember birth. New York: Ballantine Books.

Chamberlain, D. (1998). The mind of your newborn baby. Berkeley, CA: North Atlantic Books.

Gulpinar, M.A., & Yegen B.C. (2004, Dec). The physiology of learning and memory: role of peptides and stress. Current Protein and Peptide Science, 5(6), 457-473.

Heinrichs, M., Meinlschmidt G., Wippich W., Ehlert U., & Hellhammer D.H. (2004, Oct). Selective amnesic effect of oxytocin on human memory. Physiology and Behavior 30; 83(1), 31-8.

Verny, T., with Weintraub, P. (2002). Pre-parenting nurturing your child from conception. New York: Simon & Schuster.

Verny, T., with Kelly, J., (1981). The secret life of the unborn child. New York: Dell Publishing.

Akira Ikegawa, Administrative Director of Ikegawa Clinic

Send correspondence to Akira Ikegawa, MD, PhD, Administrative Director of Ikegawa Clinic. Address: 2-5-13 Daidou Kanazawa-Ku Yokohama Japan 236-0035. Email: aikegawa@seaple.icc.ne.jp