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The Prenatal Psyche: Evidence for a New Perspective

$10.00
Price: $10.00
Publication Date: 
June 2014

Through most of the 20th Century, neither medicine nor psychology provided an accurate understanding of the nature of babies in the womb or babies at birth.  Perhaps the most fundamental misconception was that brains were the only measure of mind, self and soul.  The prevailing view for a hundred years held that brains of prenates and neonates were insufficient to support cognitive, emotional, or perceptual activity.

References: 

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Bustan, M. N. & Coker, A. L. (1994). Maternal attitude toward pregnancy and the risk of neonatal death. American J. Public Health, 84(3), 411-414.
Chamberlain, D. B. (1992). Babies are not what we thought: Call for a new paradigm. International J. of Prenatal and Perinatal Studies, 4(3/4), 161-177.
Chamberlain, D. B. (1994). The sentient prenate: What every parent should know.
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Through most of the 20th Century, neither medicine nor psychology provided an accurate understanding of the nature of babies in the womb or babies at birth.  Perhaps the most fundamental misconception was that brains were the only measure of mind, self and soul.  

The Sentient Prenate: What Every Parent Should Know

$10.00
Price: $10.00
Publication Date: 
June 2014

In the 1980’s parents in large numbers were first introduced to the sensitive, perceptive, conscious, and cognitive prenate. This paper summarizes the evidence from major research findings, demonstrating that prenates are 1) sensitive and aware, 2) learn and dream, and 3) are social and communicative. Well-designed experimental programs in prenatal enrichment confirm the intelligence and receptivity of womb babies. A closing section describes the special resources now available to parents who want to deliberately enhance prenatal bonding and communication.

In the 1980’s parents in large numbers were first introduced to the sensitive, perceptive, conscious, and cognitive prenate. This paper summarizes the evidence from major research findings, demonstrating that prenates are 1) sensitive and aware, 2) learn and dream, and 3) are social and communicative. Well-designed experimental programs in prenatal enrichment confirm the intelligence and receptivity of womb babies. A closing section describes the special resources now available to parents who want to deliberately enhance prenatal bonding and communication.