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Trends and Influences in Pre- and Perinatal Psychology A Summary

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Publication Date: 
May 2014

The field of pre- and perinatal psychology (PPN) is informed by the work of many individuals, therapeutic and academic communities, and scientific achievements. Trends and influences on the field itself can be divided into several main categories: origins, historical threads, formal channels, legitimizing scientific studies and approaches, and finally, integration of therapeutic approaches. It is difficult to put all of these influences in one chronological chart; it is more like they weave together to form a tapestry.

References: 

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The field of pre- and perinatal psychology (PPN) is informed by the work of many individuals, therapeutic and academic communities, and scientific achievements. Trends and influences on the field itself can be divided into several main categories: origins, historical threads, formal channels, legitimizing scientific studies and approaches, and finally, integration of therapeutic approaches.