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Communicating with the Mind of a Prenate: Guidelines for Parents and Birth Professionals
Publication Date: 06/2014
Author(s): David B Chamberlain

After a struggle of many decades, the true dimensions of fetal consciousness are emerging, thanks to a growing literature of firsthand reports from parents and abundant observations of life in the womb. In retrospect, scientific views of the sensory, emotional, and mental nature of prenates and newborns, grounded exclusively in a brain-matter paradigm, were grossly inadequate. A new paradigm is replacing this previous scientific view based on baby awareness and knowing.

The Prenatal Psyche: Evidence for a New Perspective
Publication Date: 06/2014
Author(s): David B Chamberlain

Through most of the 20th Century, neither medicine nor psychology provided an accurate understanding of the nature of babies in the womb or babies at birth.  Perhaps the most fundamental misconception was that brains were the only measure of mind, self and soul.  The prevailing view for a hundred years held that brains of prenates and neonates were insufficient to support cognitive, emotional, or perceptual activity.

The Sentient Prenate: What Every Parent Should Know
Publication Date: 06/2014
Author(s): David B Chamberlain

In the 1980’s parents in large numbers were first introduced to the sensitive, perceptive, conscious, and cognitive prenate. This paper summarizes the evidence from major research findings, demonstrating that prenates are 1) sensitive and aware, 2) learn and dream, and 3) are social and communicative. Well-designed experimental programs in prenatal enrichment confirm the intelligence and receptivity of womb babies. A closing section describes the special resources now available to parents who want to deliberately enhance prenatal bonding and communication.

Ethical Considerations in Pre- and Perinatal Psychology Education
Publication Date: 05/2014
Author(s): Kate White

Prenatal and perinatal psychology as a field of practice an emerging discipline in the healing arts. The development of a code of  ethics  is  a  marker  of  this  maturity.  This paper was developed for the Association for Prenatal and Perinatal Psychology and Health as part of  its certification program for educators.

Fathers Reflect on Their Experiences of the Receipt of a Postnatal Diagnosis of Down Syndrome or Trisomy 21
Publication Date: 05/2014
Author(s): Desiree Lowitt, Mary Beth Averill

This exploratory study investigated the experiences of fathers upon the postnatal news that their newborn babies had been given diagnoses of Down syndrome. Thirteen fathers were interviewed about their experiences of immediate postnatal support. Participants had biological children born with Down syndrome and interacted with the western medical community regarding the child’s birth. Fathers often experienced the messengers of the news of a postnatal diagnosis of Down syndrome as insensitive and pessimistic.

Trends and Influences in Pre- and Perinatal Psychology A Summary
Publication Date: 05/2014
Author(s): Kate White, Jeane Rhodes

The field of pre- and perinatal psychology (PPN) is informed by the work of many individuals, therapeutic and academic communities, and scientific achievements. Trends and influences on the field itself can be divided into several main categories: origins, historical threads, formal channels, legitimizing scientific studies and approaches, and finally, integration of therapeutic approaches. It is difficult to put all of these influences in one chronological chart; it is more like they weave together to form a tapestry.

What is a Good Birth? Using Q Method to Explore the Diversity of Attitudes about Good Birth
Publication Date: 05/2014
Author(s): Emma Eaton

Abstract: Birth literature reveals many perspectives about “good birth,”  and  an investigation into a good birth is necessary because women and children are entitled to the experience that most supports their health as well as their psychological wellbeing and fulfillment. There exists a culture within maternity services of professionals working with apparently conflicting agendas, which may contribute to service user input being excluded. The objective of this study was to understand the viewpoints about “good birth” using a Q methodology approach.

Implantation Journey: The Original Human Myth (Part 3)
Publication Date: 03/2014
Author(s): Karlton Terry

Abstract: The implantation journey of the blastocyst/embryo is traced throughout its many biologic/embryologic transitions and transmutations. Possible psychological impacts that may arise from early stresses, imprints, and other experiences are discussed. The journeying blastocyst/embryo is sometimes portrayed as a protagonist in the transcript of each human being’s personal past. Events confronted and subsequent coping or survival styles during the journey are examined in reference to adult behavior patterns and belief systems.

Prenatal and Perinatal Medicine and Psychology Towards Integrated Neurosciences: General Remarks and Future Perspectives
Publication Date: 03/2014
Author(s): Peter G Fedor-Freybergh, Radovan Hrubý

Prenatal and perinatal psychology and medicine is an interdisciplinary scientific field of research and practice with the scientific focus on prenatal and perinatal conditions of human life. Prenatal period of human life represents a crucial phase in human life during which crucial developmental processes and regulations take place and these serve as adaptation strategies and physiological capabilities for the next postnatal life´s periods.

How Birthing Professionals Can Include Early Consciousness in Pregnancy and Birthing
Publication Date: 07/2013
Author(s): Karen Melton

The subject of prenatal consciousness should be considered outside of the very limiting arena of the American abortion debate. The recognition of prenatal consciousness as well as the reclamation of one’s own early consciousness is important for us all, and in particular for birthing professionals.

Implantation Journey: The Original Human Myth (Part I)
Publication Date: 07/2013
Author(s): Karlton Terry

The implantation journey of the blastocyst/embryo is traced throughout its many biologic/embryologic transitions and transmutations. Possible psychological impacts that may arise from early stresses, imprints, and other experiences are discussed. The journeying blastocyst/embryo is sometimes portrayed as a protagonist in the transcript of each human being’s personal past. Events confronted and subsequent coping or survival styles during the journey are examined in reference to adult behavior patterns and belief systems.

Interview with Ray Castellino, DC, RPP, RCST© “The Principles”
Publication Date: 07/2013
Author(s): Kate White

In this interview with Castellino, we explore the seven Principles by tracing their development and application to therapeutic work with babies, families, and groups. Castellino’s process is born out of need and creative genius. Having sat in Womb Surround Workshops, at board meetings and in my own private practice and named these Principles, there is no doubt that they are powerful and support change. The Principles are:

Motherhood as Opportunity to Learn Spiritual Values: Experiences and Insights of New Mothers
Publication Date: 07/2013
Author(s): Aurelie M. Athan, Lisa Miller

Abstract: This study examined the subjective daily experiences of motherhood as potential opportunities for spiritual awareness and personal transformation. It explored how an enduring commitment to fostering a child through adoption, marriage or conception may lead mothers to embrace a broadened perspective in life that mirrors the core spiritual values of world religions and perennial wisdom traditions.

Marketing Mothering as ‘Crisis’: Professions Saving us from the ‘Danger’ of Becoming Mothers
Publication Date: 04/2013
Author(s): Hilary Monk

One of the most efficient routes to profit is using discourse to frighten an entire population, and then selling them the antidote to their fear. Crisis profitability is maximized if crises can be manufactured out of commonplace life events. The medical profession has already discursively recreated childbearing as an epidemic crisis, to be technologically managed to make it ‘safe’.

Provider Trust: A Useful Concept in Maternal Care
Publication Date: 04/2013
Author(s): Elizabeth Soliday, Kimberly A. Tremblay

The maternal patient-provider relationship is important in birth experiences. However, no measures of obstetric patient-provider relationship quality exist, perhaps partially explaining why the concept has not been systematically studied in pre- and perinatal psychology and related fields. As a first step in this line of inquiry, we examined a care provider trust measure completed by 70 obstetric clinic patients along with state anxiety, fear of childbirth, and postpartum satisfaction measures. The trust measure performed similarly with our sample as in the original validation.

The Embryo’s Eloquent Form
Publication Date: 04/2013
Author(s): Stephen L. Talbott

Embryology can be investigated qualitatively by “reading” the expressive gestures of the development of the human egg and sperm, their approach to each other in the “pre-conception attraction complex,” their union at conception, and the subsequent development of the embryo. These gestures tell a remarkable and consistent story. Much of this story has to do with the play of complementary opposites, and with the “conversation” that takes place, first, between the gametes, and then between the embryo and the mother.

Effect of (rational) “Prayer” on Fetus & Mother: A Quantitative Approach
Publication Date: 01/2013
Author(s): Gajanan S Kelkar, Amita A. Dharmadhikari, Avinash Dharmadhikari

The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of “good, rational thoughts” (called “prayer”) on the fetus and the mother during the 3rd trimester of pregnancy. The good thoughts (prayer) are radiated, in the form of recording, from Swami Vijnananand, a person who was a selfless, benevolent, philosopher, thinker, who devoted his entire life for social good and totally isolated from the families undergoing the experiment. In all, 1850 cases were critically analyzed, in this study.

Effect of Planning, Wantedness, and Attachment on Prenatal Anxiety
Publication Date: 01/2013
Author(s): Kimberly A. Tremblay, Elizabeth Soliday

Anxiety symptoms are common during pregnancy. However, predictors of prenatal anxiety have not been well researched. We tested a model of pregnancy anxiety conceptualized from a stress and coping framework in which pregnancy wantedness, maternal attachment style, and attachment history were expected to predict anxiety in late pregnancy. Controlling for parity and risk, maternal attachment history significantly predicted general anxiety symptoms. Current relationship and/or attachment difficulties predicted general anxiety and prenatal anxiety subdimensions.

Interview: Mary Jackson, Certified Professional Midwife Bridging Midwifery Practice and Pre- and Perinatal Psychology Insights
Publication Date: 01/2013
Author(s): Kerry Cerelli

Interview with Mary Jackson, CPM,Midwife integrating pre and perinatal psychology principles into midwifery practice. Mary Jackson RN, CPM, LM, RCST, has been a home birth Midwife since 1975. She has attended over 2,000 births in the Santa Barbara, Ventura, and Ojai, California areas and is now attending home births with her second generation of babies. She has incorporated a two-year craniosacral training with Michael Shea and the two-year Castellino Prenatal and Birth Training into her midwifery practice.

Outcomes of HypnoBirthing
Publication Date: 01/2013
Author(s): Charles Swencionis

Compared with two surveys of usual care, these data provide strong support for the hypotheses that HypnoBirthing mothers have: fewer medical inductions (3.3%-21.1% difference); less IV fluids (37.9%-42.1% difference); less continuous fetal monitoring (42.4%-44.3% difference; less pitocin infusion (18%-19% difference); fewer artificial rupture of membranes (18.8%-18.9% difference); fewer IV/IM anesthesias (4.4%-5.7% difference); fewer episiotomies (13.3%-15.1% difference); fewer epidural anesthesias (44.6%-49.1% difference); fewer caesarian sections (14.4%-17% difference); less frequent use

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