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Birth with No Regret in Turkey

Publication Date: 
December, 2019

This article discusses Birth with No Regret, a new model of birth care in Turkey in which, throughout parturition, the mother is cared for humanistically by an egalitarian, non-hierarchical team consisting of an obstetrician, midwife, and birth psychologist.

Open and Closed Knowledge Systems, The Four Stages of Cognition, and the Cultural Management of Birth: Part 2

Publication Date: 
December, 2019

This is Part 2 of a conceptual “think piece”. Part 1 looked at four Stages of Cognition, relating each of them to an anthropological concept: Stages 1 and 2 encode closed, rigid, or concrete thinking. More open and fluid are Stage 3, cultural relativism (all ways are valid), and Stage 4, global humanism (we must seek ways that honor individual human rights).

Part 2 categorizes birth practitioners within these four Stages, while showing how ongoing stress can cause even the most fluid of thinkers to degenerate into Substage—a condition of cognitive regression, or “losing it,” that can result in obstetric violence. I note how ritual can help practitioners ground themselves at least at a Stage 1 level and offer ways in which they can rejuvenate and re-inspire themselves. I also describe the persecution that Stage 4 practitioners often experience from fundamentalist or fanatical Stage 1 practitioners and officials, often referred to as the “global witch hunt.”

Open and Closed Knowledge Systems, The Four Stages of Cognition, and the Cultural Management of Birth: Part 1

Publication Date: 
September, 2019

This is a two-part article. Part One of this article describes four stages of cognition and their anthropological equivalents to better understand both the resistance to and the acceptance of pre- and perinatal psychology and other ways of thinking about birth. Part Two will appear in the Winter 2019 issue.

PHYSIOLOGICAL BIRTH PREPARATION

Publication Date: 
March, 2019

"No Child Is Ours" The Absence of Motherhood as Reflected in Women's Poetry

Publication Date: 
December, 2018

This article explores the significance of motherhood, including historical and cultural perspectives, and considers how women who have not created a child can explore their creativity through poetry.

The “Natural” Cesarean: An Online Survey of Israeli Women’s Attitudes

Publication Date: 
December, 2018

This article discusses a study that assessed Israeli women’s attitudes toward the "natural" cesarean technique via an online survey and maps obstetric departments with its practice.

Book Review by Tina Merrill: Ways of Knowing about Birth: Mothers, Midwives, Medicine & Birth Activism by Robbie Davis-Floyd

Publication Date: 
June, 2018

Ways of Knowing about Birth is a compilation of Robbie Davis-Floyd’s writings spanning thirty years. The selections in this volume offer valuable insights for many readers, from students of midwifery, anthropology and women’s studies, to practicing midwives and obstetricians, to women who are seeking to inform themselves about their own childbirth care options.

Book Review by Michael Trout: Meeting the Needs of Parents Pregnant and Parenting after Perinatal Loss by Joann O’Leary and Jane Warland

Publication Date: 
June, 2018

This book review discusses prenatal attachment, bereavement, and supporting parents who experience pre and perinatal loss.

Breema: Parenting with the Nine Principles of Harmony

Publication Date: 
June, 2018

This article provides background and examples for how using simple principles such as No Judgment, Firmness, and Gentleness, and No Hurry/No Pause in daily life offers a means for self-care in the midst of a hectic day. 

The Intellectual Marginalization of Childbirth and its Real-World Implications

Publication Date: 
March, 2018

This paper focuses on the topic of childbirth, exploring the history of its marginalization within the humanities. This paper demonstrates that ignoring birth on an intellectual level contributes to diminishing the topic more broadly on the cultural level, and this has real-world implications for how our societies treat children, women, and families.

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